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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Alex Keen 4 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #2136
    zzx8321 view profile
    Participant

    Hi,

    I have a question. I know that temperatures in space are below the zero, but I want to send a tablet into the space. In space the camera should film this tablet, because we are making a campaign and we send our costumers pictures into space. Do you know how to protect tablet from cold?

    Best regards,

    A

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  • #2138
    Alex view profile
    Keymaster

    Hi, and welcome to the forum,

     

    It’s a tricky prospect for a few reasons to send a phone or tablet into space. Certainly the cold will eat batteries, the best way to protect it would probably be to (a) get a usb battery pack as an additional source and (b) heat the device as best possible. We would 3d print a mount that encompasses an enclosure for heating pads (chemically activated rather than air activated).

     

    If you’re looking to conduct this launch as a corporate task we’d be happy to discuss carrying it out on your behalf. We have some experience sending phones into space and would be more than happy to discuss in more detail. Feel free to drop us an email at corporate (@) sentintospace.com

     

    Alex

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  • #3133
    Barney view profile
    Participant

    Hi.

    I have assembled my 2KG balloon kit, but have yet to fit an altimeter, I have looked into a couple of Arduino devices but they don’t seem to be capable of resolving heights over 10KM, can you suggest a suitable device please?

    Best wishes.

    Barney

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  • #3150

    Hi Barney,

    Sorry for the long response time, our forum has been having issues with notifying us of new posts.

    Reporting positional data over a certain height is restricted on a lot of devices because of regulations about weapons components.

    An ICBM relies on a GPS chip which reports at very high altitudes and speeds, so manufacturers aren’t allowed to sell chips which go over certain speeds AND report at altitude to the general public. As a result, most just don’t report either for convenience (and because the demand from consumers is pretty low).

    We use a Pi in the Sky to report live location data. There’s extensive instructions on the website; if you have even a little background in using Arduino devices it shouldn’t be too challenging.

    If you find another solution, we’re always happy to hear about it!

    Thanks,

    Alex

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